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Cedarburg

Historic Cedarburg

Cedarburg is located in beautiful Ozaukee County 20 miles north of downtown Milwaukee and just minutes west of Lake Michigan. Close proximity to Interstate 43 and Highway 45 provides easy access for Cedarburg residents to the Milwaukee metropolitan attractions. Cedarburg also boasts several amenities of its own, including the last covered bridge in Wisconsin, the Interurban Trail, Pleasant Valley Nature Park and historic downtown Cedarburg – all only minutes from downtown.

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Cedarburg has two separate districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places, with more than 200 buildings of historical significance. These structures in the heart of the city remain in use as shops, homes, museums, and public buildings, providing a focal point for the community’s daily life. Cedarburg’s leaders have developed a long-range plan for industrial and economic expansion to ensure orderly growth. At the same time, the community remains committed to protecting the environment and preserving Cedarburg’s historical flavor.

The Ozaukee Interurban Trail is a 30-mile paved trail that spans the entire length of Ozaukee County. The majority of the trail is off-road and perfect for family enjoyment. The trail connects the Ozaukee communities of Mequon, Thiensville, Cedarburg, Grafton, Port Washington and Belgium by using the existing right-of-way owned by We Energies. The trail is used as a commuter route for employment, businesses, industry, and commerce.

The Cedarburg Bridge is the last remaining covered bridge in the state of Wisconsin. This structure was built in 1876 and was retired as an auto bridge in 1962. It was built by the town of Cedarburg using pine logs that were cut and milled at Baraboo, Wisconsin. These logs were fitted and set in place in lattice truss construction using 3×10 inch planks that were secured by two-inch hardwood pins. This technique eliminated the use of nails or bolts. The bridge was floored by 3-inch planking. In 1940, the Ozaukee County Board voted to assume the preservation and maintenance of this bridge. A plaque with information about the bridge was erected in 1965 by the Ozaukee County Historical Society.

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